My Week in Books – 9th January 2022

MyWeekinBooks

On What Cathy Read Next last week

Monday – I shared my Five Favourite December 2021 Reads.  

Tuesday – This week’s Top Ten Tuesday topic was Most Anticipated Books Releasing In The First Half of 2022

WednesdayWWW Wednesday is the opportunity to share what I’ve just read, what I’m currently reading and what I plan to read next… and to take a peek at what others are reading. 

Thursday – I shared my publication day review of historical romance, The Cornish Captive by Nicola Pryce.

Friday – I published my review of Wahala by Nikki May as part of the blog tour.

Saturday – I published my review of spy thriller, Betrayal by David Gilman, as part of the blog tour and, to mark its publication in paperback, I shared my review of The Ends of the Earth by Abbie Greaves

As always, thanks to everyone who has liked, commented on or shared my blog posts on social media.


New arrivals

Sell Us The RopeSell Us The Rope by Stephen May (eARC, Sandstone Press via NetGalley)

May 1907. Young Stalin – poet, bank-robber, spy – is in London for the 5th Congress of the Russian Communist Party. As he builds his powerbase in the party, Stalin manipulates alliances with Lenin, Trotsky, and Rosa Luxemburg under the eyes of the Czar’s secret police.

Meanwhile he is drawn to the fiery Finnish activist Elli Vuokko and risks everything in a relationship as complicated as it is dangerous.

The Mirror Game CoverThe Mirror Game by Guy Gardner (eARC, The Book Guild)

London 1925. When Adrian Harcourt, a politician and captain in the army believed dead with his company on the battlefield of Flanders, is sighted looking like he’s been living rough, Harry Lark, a war veteran and journalist, is enlisted by his friend and benefactor Lady Carlise to investigate.

As he becomes drawn further into the case and the deaths mount up, he can see that things don’t add up. Where has Adrian been for so many years? Why can’t he remember parts of his past?

Looking further into Adrian’s previous life, even as his own dark past and addiction to laudanum threatens to overwhelm him, Harry begins to fall for Lady Carlise’s beautiful daughter Freddy, who was also Adrian’s fiancé.

Chasing the leads as they continue to unravel, can Harry solve the mystery behind what really happened to Adrian before it’s too late?

The StreetsThe Streets by Anthony Quinn (Vintage)

In 1882, David Wildeblood, a 21-year-old from rural Norfolk, arrives in London to start work at the offices of a famous man. As an ‘inspector’ for Henry Marchmont’s hugely successful weekly The Labouring Classes of London, his job is to investigate the notorious slum of Somers Town, near the new St Pancras Station, recording house by house the number of inhabitants, their occupations and standard of living. By mapping the streets in this way, Marchmont intends to show the world the stark realities of poverty in its greatest city.

Befriended by Jo, a young coster, and his sister Roma, David comes to learn the slang of the hawkers and traders, sharpers and scavengers, magsmen and mobsmen, who throng the teeming byways of Somers Town. It is a place of Darwinian struggle for survival. And the deeper he penetrates the everyday squalor and destitution the more appalled he is by mounting evidence that someone is making a profit from people’s suffering.

A dinner at the Kensington home of his godfather Sir Martin Elder introduces him to Kitty, Elder’s only daughter, and to a cabal of prominent citizens who have been plotting a radical solution to the problem of London’s poor. David belatedly realises that a conspiracy is afoot. Passionate but reckless in his urge to uncover it he finds his life in danger, sustained only by the faithfulness of a friend and, ultimately, the love of a woman.

YinkaYinka, where is your huzband? by Lizzie Damilola Blackburn (ARC, Viking)

Yinka wants to find love. The problem is she also has a mum who thinks she’s better qualified to find it for her.

She also has too many aunties who frequently pray for her delivery from singledom, a preference for chicken and chips over traditional Nigerian food, and a bum she’s sure is far too small as a result. Oh, and the fact that she’s a thirty-one-year-old South-Londoner who doesn’t believe in sex before marriage is a bit of an obstacle too…

When her cousin gets engaged, Yinka commences Operation Find A Date for Rachel’s Wedding. Will Yinka find herself a huzband? And what if the thing she really needs is to find herself?


On What Cathy Read Next this week

Currently reading

Planned posts

  • What’s In A Name 2022 Sign-Up
  • Book Review: Jane’s Country Year by Malcolm Saville 
  • Historical Fiction Reading Challenge 2022 Sign-Up
  • Blog Tour/Book Review: Finding Edith Pinsent by Hazel Ward

My Week in Books – 2nd January 2022

MyWeekinBooks

On What Cathy Read Next last week

Happy New Year everyone!

Monday – I published my review of historical crime mystery The Unquiet Heart by Kaite Welsh.

Tuesday – This week’s Top Ten Tuesday topic was the always challenging Best Books I Read in 2021

WednesdayWWW Wednesday is the opportunity to share what I’ve just read, what I’m currently reading and what I plan to read next… and to take a peek at what others are reading. 

Thursday – I shared my review of Blue Shoes and Happiness (No.1 Ladies’ Detective Agency #7) by Alexander McCall Smith, the final book I needed to complete the What’s In A Name Challenge 2021.

Friday – I published my review of Love After Love by Ingrid Persaud and shared My Life in Books 2021.

Saturday – The first Saturday of the month – and of a new year – means it’s time for Six Degrees of Separation

As always, thanks to everyone who has liked, commented on or shared my blog posts on social media.


New arrivals

The MagicianThe Magician by Colm Tóibín (Viking)

The Magician tells the story of Thomas Mann, whose life was filled with great acclaim and contradiction. He would find himself on the wrong side of history in the First World War, cheerleading the German army, but have a clear vision of the future in the second, anticipating the horrors of Nazism.

He would have six children and keep his homosexuality hidden; he was a man forever connected to his family and yet bore witness to the ravages of suicide. He would write some of the greatest works of European literature, and win the Nobel Prize, but would never return to the country that inspired his creativity.

Rose NicolsonRose Nicolson by Andrew Greig (Quercus)

Embra, winter of 1574. Queen Mary has fled Scotland, to raise an army from the French. Her son and heir, Jamie is held under protection in Stirling Castle. John Knox is dead. The people are unmoored and lurching under the uncertain governance of this riven land. It’s a deadly time for young student Will Fowler, short of stature, low of birth but mightily ambitious, to make his name.

Fowler has found himself where the scorch marks of the martyrs burned at the stake can be seen on every street, where differences in doctrine can prove fatal, where the feuds of great families pull innocents into their bloody realm. There he befriends the austere stick-wielding philosopher Tom Nicolson, son of a fishing family whose sister Rose, untutored, brilliant and exceedingly beautiful exhibits a free-thinking mind that can only bring danger upon her and her admirers.

The lowly students are adept at attracting the attentions of the rich and powerful, not least Walter Scott, brave and ruthless heir to Branxholm and Buccleuch, who is set on exploiting the civil wars to further his political and dynastic ambitions. His friendship and patronage will lead Will to the to the very centre of a conspiracy that will determine who will take Scotland’s crown.


On What Cathy Read Next this week

Currently reading

Planned posts

  • My Five Favourite December 2021 Reads
  • Book Review: The Cornish Captive by Nicola Pryce
  • Blog Tour/Book Review: Wahala by Nikki May
  • Blog Tour/Book Review: Betrayal by David Gilman
  • Blog Tour/Book Review: The Ends of the Earth by Abbie Greaves