My Five Favourite February 2021 Reads

favourite

I read fourteen books in February. Yes, I was surprised by that number as well but, frankly, what else is there to do at the moment? I found something to enjoy in all the books I read but there were a few that stood out. Links from each title will take you to my review. You can find a list of all the books I’ve read so far in 2021 here.  If we’re not already friends on Goodreads, send me a friend request or follow my reviews.

When The World Was Ours by Liz Kessler – Inspired by the true story of her father’s escape from Nazi-occupied Europe, the author takes the reader on a journey from Vienna in 1936 to the outbreak of the Second World War and beyond in the company of three childhood friends

A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith – The heartwarming story of the Nolan family, first-generation immigrants to the United States, and their life in the Williamsburg slums of Brooklyn

The Diplomat’s Wife by Michael Ridpath – An eventful road trip across Cold War era Europe combined with all the ingredients of a wartime espionage thriller

Daughters of Night by Laura Shepherd-Robinson – Intricately plotted historical crime novel that oozes period atmosphere

Madam by Phoebe Wynne – Elements of suspense combined with a distinctly dystopian feel makes for an unsettling but utterly compelling read

What books were amongst your favourites in February? Have you read any of my picks?

My Five Favourite November Reads

My 5 Favourite November Reads

I read sixteen books in November and, yes, I was surprised with that total as well. In fact, I demanded a recount!  I found something to enjoy in all the books I read but there were a few that stood out. Links from the titles will take you to my reviews. You can find a list of all the books I’ve read so far in 2020 here.  If we’re not already friends on Goodreads, send me a friend request or follow my reviews.


Hell Gate by Jeff Dawson – the third in the author’s Ingo Finch historical thriller series, this time set in early nineteenth century New York. An intrepid hero, interesting location and a twisty plot that cleverly combines fact and fiction – what more could you want?

How To Belong by Sarah Franklin – a tender story about finding your place in the world set in the Forest of Dean.

The Stasi Game by David Young – if we’re to believe the author, the sixth and last (sob!) in the historical crime series featuring East Germany’s People’s Police officer, Captain Karin Müller.

Three Women and a Boat by Anne Youngson – a trip along the canals of England proves a life-changing experience for two women and the narrowboat’s owner.

Imperfect Alchemist by Naomi Miller – the author transforms historical fact into the engrossing story of Mary Sidney, a remarkable woman clearly ahead of her time.

What were your favourite reads in November? Have you read any of my picks?