My Week in Books – 14th November 2021

MyWeekinBooks

On What Cathy Read Next last week

Blog posts

Monday – I published my review of The Vanishing Half by Brit Bennett.

Tuesday I shared my publication day review of historical crime mystery, Down A Dark River by Karen Odden.

WednesdayWWW Wednesday is the opportunity to share what I’ve just read, what I’m currently reading and what I plan to read next… and to have a good nose around what others are reading. I also published my review of crime novel, The Quiet People by Paul Cleave as part of the blog tour.

Thursday – I shared my review of My Secret Sister by Lauren Westwood as part of the blog tour which includes a giveaway.

Friday – I published my review of Gods of Rome (Rise of Emperors #3) by Gordon Doherty and Simon Turney as part of the blog tour. 

Saturday – As part of NetGalley November I shared my review of historical novel, Lily by Rose Tremain.

As always, thanks to everyone who has liked, commented on or shared my blog posts on social media.


New arrivals

Before We Grow OldBefore We Grow Old by Clare Swatman (eARC, Boldwood via NetGalley)

Some people are just made for each other…

When seven-year-old Fran first met Will they knew instantly that they were made for each other. For eleven years they were inseparable, but then, at the age of eighteen, Will just upped and disappeared.

Twenty-five years later Will is back. Is fate trying to give them a second chance?

Still nursing the heart break from all those years ago, Fran is reluctant to give Will the time of day. The price Will must pay is to tell the truth – the truth about why he left, the truth about why he’s back… And Fran has her own secrets to hide. The time has come to decide what Fran and Will really want from life – before it’s too late.

The Man in the BunkerThe Man in the Bunker by Rory Clements (eARC, Zaffre via NetGalley)

Germany, late summer 1945 – The war is over but the country is in ruins. Millions of refugees and holocaust survivors strive to rebuild their lives in displaced persons camps. Millions of German soldiers and SS men are held captive in primitive conditions in open-air detention centres. Everywhere, civilians are desperate for food and shelter. No one admits to having voted Nazi, yet many are unrepentant.

Adolf Hitler is said to have killed himself in his Berlin bunker. But no body was found – and many people believe he is alive. Newspapers are full of stories reporting sightings and theories. Even Stalin, whose own troops captured the bunker, has told President Truman he believes the former Fuhrer is not dead.  Day by day, American and British intelligence officers subject senior members of the Nazi regime to gruelling interrogation in their quest for their truth.

Enter Tom Wilde – the Cambridge professor and spy sent in to find out the truth… 

WahalaWahala by Nikki May (eARC, Doubleday via NetGalley)

Ronke, Simi, Boo are three mixed-race friends living in London. They have the gift of two cultures, Nigerian and English, though not all of them choose to see it that way.

Everyday racism has never held them back, but now in their thirties, they question their future. Ronke wants a husband (he must be Nigerian); Boo enjoys (correction: endures) stay-at-home motherhood; while Simi, full of fashion career dreams, rolls her eyes as her boss refers to her urban vibe yet again.

When Isobel, a lethally glamorous friend from their past arrives in town, she is determined to fix their futures for them.

Cracks in their friendship begin to appear, and it is soon obvious Isobel is not sorting but wrecking. When she is driven to a terrible act, the women are forced to reckon with a crime in their past that may just have repeated itself.

Red Is My HeartRed Is My Heart by Antoine Laurain & Le Sonneur (ARC, Gallic Books)

How can you mend a broken heart? Do you write a letter to the woman who left you – and post it to an imaginary address? Buy a new watch, to reset your life? Or get rid of the jacket you wore every time you argued, because it was in some way … responsible?

Combining the wry musings of a rejected lover with playful drawings in just three colours – red, black and white – bestselling author of The Red Notebook, Antoine Laurain, and renowned street artist Le Sonneur have created a striking addition to the literature of unrequited love.

Sharp, yet warm, whimsical and deeply Parisian, this is a must for all Antoine Laurain fans.


On What Cathy Read Next this week

Currently reading

Planned posts

  • Blog Tour/Book Review: The Custard Corpses by M.J. Porter
  • Book Review: Now We Shall Be Entirely Free by Andrew Miller 
  • Book Review: No Way To Die by Tony Kent 
  • Book Review: Eureka by Anthony Quinn
  • Book Review: The Red Monarch by Bella Ellis

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