My Week in Books – 30th May 2021

MyWeekinBooks

On What Cathy Read Next last week

Blog posts

Tuesday This week’s Top Ten Tuesday topic was all about quotations and I shared a list of books whose titles are drawn from other works of literature. I also published my review of This Other Island by Steffanie Edward as part of the blog tour.

WednesdayWWW Wednesday is the opportunity to share what I’ve just read, what I’m currently reading and what I plan to read next… and to have a good nose around what others are reading. 

Thursday – I shared my review of Love and Miss Harris by Peter Maughan as part of the blog tour. I also joined the celebration of the 15th anniversary of The Reading Agency’s Quick Reads literacy initiative with my review of The Baby Is Mine by Oyinkan Braithwaite.

Friday – I published my review of Everyday Magic by Charlie Laidlaw.

Saturday – I shared my thoughts on A Room Made of Leaves by Kate Grenville, one of the books on the shortlist for The Walter Scott Prize for Historical Fiction 2021.

As always, thanks to everyone who has liked, commented on or shared my blog posts on social media.


New arrivals

The FortThe Fort (City of Victory #1) by Adrian Goldsworthy (ARC, courtesy of Head of Zeus) 

AD 105: Dacia. The Dacian kingdom and Rome are at peace, but no one thinks that it will last. Sent to command an isolated fort beyond the Danube, centurion Flavius Ferox can sense that war is coming, but also knows that enemies may be closer to home.

Many of the Brigantes under his command are former rebels and convicts, as likely to kill him as obey an order. And then there is Hadrian, the emperor’s cousin, and a man with plans of his own.

A Line To KillA Line to Kill (Hawthorne #3) by Anthony Horowitz (ARC, courtesy of Century)

When ex-Detective Inspector Daniel Hawthorne and his sidekick, author Anthony Horowitz, are invited to an exclusive literary festival on Alderney, an idyllic island off the south coast of England, they don’t expect to find themselves in the middle of murder investigation – or to be trapped with a cold-blooded killer in a remote place with a murky, haunted past.

Arriving on Alderney, Hawthorne and Horowitz soon meet the festival’s other guests – an eccentric gathering that includes a bestselling children’s author, a French poet, a TV chef turned cookbook author, a blind psychic, and a war historian – along with a group of ornery locals embroiled in an escalating feud over a disruptive power line.

When a local grandee is found dead under mysterious circumstances, Hawthorne and Horowitz become embroiled in the case. The island is locked down, no one is allowed on or off, and it soon becomes horribly clear that a murderer lurks in their midst. But who?

The Penguin Book of Spanish Short StoriesThe Penguin Book of Spanish Short Stories edited by Margaret Jull Costa (ARC, courtesy of Penguin) 

This exciting new collection celebrates the richness and variety of the Spanish short story, from the nineteenth century to the present day. Featuring over fifty stories selected by revered translator Margaret Jull Costa, it blends old favourites and hidden gems – many of which have never before been translated into English – and introduces readers to surprising new voices as well as giants of Spanish literary culture, from Emilia Pardo Bazán and Leopoldo Alas, through Mercè Rodoreda and Manuel Rivas, to Ana Maria Matute and Javier Marías.

Brimming with romance, horror, history, farce, strangeness and beauty, and showcasing alluring hairdressers, war defectors, vampiric mothers, and talismanic mandrake roots, the daring and entertaining assortment of tales in The Penguin Book of Spanish Short Stories will be a treasure trove for readers.

Agent Running in the Field by John le Carré

Nat, a 47 year-old veteran of Britain’s Secret Intelligence Service, believes his years as an agent runner are over. He is back in London with his wife, the long-suffering Prue. But with the growing threat from Moscow Centre, the office has one more job for him. Nat is to take over The Haven, a defunct substation of London General with a rag-tag band of spies. The only bright light on the team is young Florence, who has her eye on Russia Department and a Ukrainian oligarch with a finger in the Russia pie.

Nat is not only a spy, he is a passionate badminton player. His regular Monday evening opponent is half his age: the introspective and solitary Ed. Ed hates Brexit, hates Trump and hates his job at some soulless media agency. And it is Ed, of all unlikely people, who will take Prue, Florence and Nat himself down the path of political anger that will ensnare them all.

Agent Running in the Field The Girl With the Louding Voice
The Girl With The Louding Voice by Abi Daré

I don’t just want to be having any kind voice… I want a louding voice.

At fourteen, Adunni dreams of getting an education and giving her family a more comfortable home in her small Nigerian village. Instead, Adunni’s father sells her off to become the third wife of an old man. When tragedy strikes in her new home, Adunni flees to the wealthy enclaves of Lagos, where she becomes a house-girl to the cruel Big Madam, and prey to Big Madam’s husband. But despite her situation continuously going from bad to worse, Adunni refuses to let herself be silenced. And one day, someone hears her.

Secret Keeper CoverThe Secret Keeper of Jaipur (The Henna Artist #2) by Alka Joshi (eARC, courtesy of Mira Books) 

It’s the spring of 1969, and Lakshmi, now married to Dr. Jay Kumar, directs the Healing Garden in Shimla. Malik has finished his private school education. At twenty, he has just met a young woman named Nimmi when he leaves to apprentice at the Facilities Office of the Jaipur Royal Palace. Their latest project: a state-of-the-art cinema.

Malik soon finds that not much has changed as he navigates the Pink City of his childhood. Power and money still move seamlessly among the wealthy class, and favors flow from Jaipur’s Royal Palace, but only if certain secrets remain buried. When the cinema’s balcony tragically collapses on opening night, blame is placed where it is convenient. But Malik suspects something far darker and sets out to uncover the truth. As a former street child, he always knew to keep his own counsel; it’s a lesson that will serve him as he untangles a web of lies.


On What Cathy Read Next this week

Currently reading

Planned posts

  • Blog Tour/Book Review: Sword of Bone by Anthony Rhodes
  • Book Review: Miss Pettigrew Lives For A Day by Winifred Watson
  • Top Ten Tuesday
  • Waiting on Wednesday
  • Book Review: Two Women in Rome by Elizabeth Buchan
  • #6Degrees of Separation 

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