My Week in Books – 27th September 2020

MyWeekinBooks

On What Cathy Read Next last week

Blog posts

Monday – I shared my review of Skelton’s Guide to Domestic Poisons by David Stafford.

Tuesday – This week’s Top Ten Tuesday topic was Books On My Autumn 2020 TBR

Wednesday – It wouldn’t be “hump day” without WWW Wednesday, the opportunity to share what I’ve just read, what I’m currently reading and what I plan to read next…as well as have a good nose around to see what other bloggers are reading.

Thursday – I shared my publication day review of Adrift: How Our World Lost Its Way by Amin Maalouf.

Friday – I joined the blog tour for The Second Marriage by Gill Paul.

 As always, thanks to everyone who has liked, commented on or so shared my blog posts on social media.


New arrivals

Three Women and a Boat by Anne Youngson (eARC, courtesy of Doubleday via NetGalley)

Meet Eve, who has departed from her thirty-year career to become a Free Spirit; Sally, who has waved goodbye to her indifferent husband and two grown-up children; and Anastasia: defiantly independent narrowboat-dweller, suddenly vulnerable as she awaits a life-saving operation.

Inexperienced and ill-equipped, Sally and Eve embark upon a journey through the canals of England, guided by the remote and unsympathetic Anastasia. As they glide gently – and not so gently – through the countryside, the eccentricities and challenges of canal boat life draw them inexorably together, and a tender and unforgettable story unfolds.

When I Come Home Again by Caroline Scott (eARC, courtesy of Simon & Schuster via NetGalley)

How can you know who you are, when you choose to forget who you’ve been?

November 1918. On the cusp of the end of the First World War, a uniformed soldier is arrested in Durham Cathedral. It quickly becomes clear that he has no memory of who he is or how he came to be there. The soldier is given the name Adam and transferred to a rehabilitation home where his doctor James tries everything he can to help Adam remember who he once was. There’s just one problem. Adam doesn’t want to remember.

Unwilling to relive the trauma of war, Adam has locked his mind away, seemingly for good. But when a newspaper publishes Adam’s photograph, three women come forward, each just as certain that Adam is their relative and that he should go home with them.

But does Adam really belong with any of these women? Or is there another family waiting for him to come home?

Expectation by Anna Hope (paperback, giveaway prize courtesy of Penguin UK and Jo at JaffaReadsToo)

What happened to the women we were supposed to become?

Hannah, Cate and Lissa are young, vibrant and inseparable. Living on the edge of a common in East London, their shared world is ablaze with art and activism, romance and revelry – and the promise of everything to come. They are electric. They are the best of friends.

Ten years on, they are not where they hoped to be. Amidst flailing careers and faltering marriages, each hungers for what the others have. And each wrestles with the same question: what does it take to lead a meaningful life?

The Legacy of Elizabeth Pringle by Kirsty Wark (paperback, charity shop purchase)

Elizabeth Pringle lived all her long life on the Scottish island of Arran. But did anyone really know her? In her will she leaves her beloved house, Holmlea, to a stranger – a young mother she’d seen pushing a pram down the road over thirty years ago. It now falls to Martha, once the baby in that pram, to answer the question: why? Martha is coping with her mother’s dementia and the possibility of a new life on Arran could be a new start.

On Canaan’s Side by Sebastian Barry (paperback, charity shop purchase)

Narrated by Lilly Bere, On Canaan’s Side opens as she mourns the loss of her grandson, Bill. The story then goes back to the moment she was forced to flee Dublin, at the end of the First World War, and follows her life through into the new world of America, a world filled with both hope and danger.

At once epic and intimate, Lilly’s narrative unfurls as she tries to make sense of the sorrows and troubles of her life and of the people whose lives she has touched. Spanning nearly seven decades, it is a novel of memory, war, family-ties and love, which once again displays Sebastian Barry’s exquisite prose and gift for storytelling.

The Coral Bride by Roxanne Bouchard, trans. by David Warriner (eARC, courtesy of Orenda Books)

When an abandoned lobster trawler is found adrift off the coast of Quebec’s Gaspé Peninsula, DS Joaquin Moralès begins a straightforward search for the boat’s missing captain, Angel Roberts – a rare female in a male-dominated world. But Moralès finds himself blocked at every turn – by his police colleagues, by fisheries bureaucrats, and by his grown-up son, who has turned up at his door with a host of his own personal problems.

When Angel’s body is finally discovered, it’s clear something very sinister is afoot, and Moralès and son are pulled into murky, dangerous waters, where old resentments run deep.


On What Cathy Read Next this week

Currently reading

Planned posts

  • Blog Tour/Book Review: Dear Child by Romy Haussman
  • Top Ten Tuesday: Favourite Book Quotes
  • Waiting on Wednesday
  • Book Review: The Magic Walking Stick by John Buchan
  • Blog Tour/Book Review: Green Hands by Barbara Whitton
  • Blog Tour/Book Review: Hunter Killer by Brad Taylor
  • Book Review: This Green and Pleasant Land by Ayisha Malik
  • #6Degrees of Separation

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