The Fragile Thread of Hope by Pankaj Giri

I’m delighted to shine the spotlight today on The Fragile Thread of Hope, the latest book by author and blogger, Pankaj Giri. Below you can find an extract from the book which illustrates the beautiful writing that’s earning The Fragile Thread of Hope such positive reviews.

I’m grateful to Pankaj for sending me a review copy of his book which I’m looking forward to see reach the top of my review pile soon – especially now I’ve read that extract!

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TheFragileThreadofHopeAbout the Book

In the autumn of 2012, destiny wreaks havoc on two unsuspecting people – Soham and Fiona. Although his devastating past involving his brother still haunted him, Soham had established a promising career for himself in Bangalore. After a difficult childhood, Fiona’s fortunes had finally taken a turn for the better. She had married her beloved, and her life was as perfect as she had ever imagined it to be. But when tragedy strikes them yet again, their fundamentally fragile lives threaten to fall apart. Can Fiona and Soham overcome their grief? Will the overwhelming pain destroy their lives?

Seasoned with the flavours of exotic Nepalese traditions and set in the picturesque Indian hill station, Gangtok, The Fragile Thread of Hope explores the themes of spirituality, faith, alcoholism, love, and guilt while navigating the complex maze of familial relationships. Inspirational and heart-wrenchingly intimate, it urges you to wonder – does hope stand a chance in this travesty called life?

Praise for The Fragile Thread of Hope

Pankaj’s characters certainly evoke sympathy and throw light on important social issues. A good read.” (Chitra Divakaruni, award-winning bestselling author of The Palace of Illusions)

“An epic tale of love, loss, hope and faith that will remain with you long after the final page. With its lovely characters and beautiful prose, it ranks right up there with my favourites.” (Renita D’Silva, award-nominated bestselling author of The Forgotten Daughter)

“A literary masterpiece!” (Keshav Aneel, bestselling author of Promise Me A Million Times)

Format: eBook (408 pp.)                         Publisher:
Published: 29th October 2017                Genre: Contemporary Fiction

Purchase Links*
Amazon.co.uk ǀ Amazon.com
*links provided for convenience, not as part of any affiliate programme

 

Find The Fragile Thread of Hope on Goodreads


Extract from The Fragile Thread of Hope by Pankaj Giri

As the rented taxi wound its way through the meandering road alongside the mighty Teesta River, Fiona found herself gazing at the gorgeous landscape unveiling like a painting in front of her eyes. A thick veil of mist floated across the lofty hilltops. The sky darkened bit by bit as the overcast evening eased into night. A drizzle wiped the dust off dry leaves and moistened the parched mud all around her. A crisp gust of air sneaked in through the window and messed up her hair. After tolerating the heat of Siliguri, the breezy journey towards Gangtok felt like paradise. Despite having a gala time at a beautiful place like Goa, she realized – nothing beats the feeling of returning home.

Her focus drifted to a number playing on the local FM. It was an old Falguni Pathak song – ‘Tune paayal jo chhankaayi’. The singer’s first name triggered a wave of remembrance in her. A worm of unease wriggled in her stomach as her mind scraped a long forgotten past – Falguni was her first name once. All at once, an image invaded her mind, an image from her dark past, an image that still haunted her from time to time – the eyes, the bloodshot, glazed eyes, the eyes reeking of fury, the eyes belonging to the one who had wrecked the sapling of her childhood. The stench of alcohol, the stink ingrained in her memory, engulfed her as a bolt of near physical pain sliced through her stomach. A long-forgotten yet familiar disgust emerged in her.

She let out a sigh to disperse the painful memory. Her eyes then drifted towards Joseph. He was dozing, his spiky-haired head propped up against her shoulder. An aura of childlike innocence radiated from him. She gazed at her husband, the man who came into her life like an angel, the man who wiped away the blackness of her past, the man who taught her how to smile again. Slanting droplets kissed her lap, snatching her attention. As she looked out, she saw that the rain had picked up. A flash of lightning lit up the inky sky. She reached for the window crank and rotated it to close the window. As she sunk back into her seat, she saw that Joseph had woken up. He yawned, his mouth forming a big O. There was a hint of redness in his eyes. He yawned again, but this time she couldn’t help herself. She blocked up his gaping mouth with her hand. A mischievous smile beamed across his fair, clean-shaven face.

“Where are we?” he asked, his voice thick with sleep.

“No idea.”

“Near Kali Jhora, sir, forty kilometers away from Teesta,” the driver cut in.

“Oh.” Joseph yawned again.

“You’ll never learn, ni?”

“What?”

“Yawning with your mouth wide open… You’re so shameless.”

Joseph chuckled. Dragging her eyes to the view outside, she said, “Isn’t it beautiful, the lazy rain and the majestic hills?”

“Yeah…” His lacklustre reply irritated her. She glared at him. “Chya, you’ve become so boring nowadays.”

Joseph smirked. “C’mon, we’re not tourists. We’ve travelled this way so many times. I get bored watching these monotonous hills and this stupid rain.”

She hurled her gaze towards the scenery, annoyance swirling in her head like a wasp.

“As I hear the pitter-patter of the raindrops in these… umm… beautiful, no, gorgeous hills, umm…”

His husky voice drew her eyes towards him. He looked adorable as he struggled to search for words.

“My beautiful wife seems even prettier, umm—”

“Enough.” She laughed.

“Sorry, you know I’m not very good with words.”

“You don’t have to be.” She gazed into his gorgeous, chocolate eyes, and melted, like always, seeing the naked affection in them. She slid down in her seat, rested her head on his shoulder, and twined her arms around his.

“I love you,” Joseph whispered into her ears, caressing her arm with tender care.

She smiled, bliss seeping deep into her heart. “I know,” she said.

A deafening sound crashed against her ears. Something hit the vehicle from the left. The brakes screeched as the cab tilted towards the right. Suddenly, the world turned upside down. Her head hit metal with a clang. Through her blurred, upturned vision, she saw the vehicle sliding towards the edge of the cliff, the driver’s cries echoing in her ears. Fear gripped her, a fear like never before. As she sought Joseph, a piercing pain ripped through her leg. Then, as a slippery fish, her conscience slipped, blanketing her into darkness.


Pankaj GiriAbout the Author

Pankaj Giri was born and brought up in Gangtok, Sikkim – a picturesque hill station in India. He began his writing career in 2015 by co-authoring a book – Friendship, Love and Killer Escapades (FLAKE). Learning from experience and the constructive criticism that he got for his first book, he has now written a new novel, The Fragile Thread of Hope, a mainstream literary fiction dealing with love, loss, and family relationships. He is currently working in the government sector in Sikkim. He likes to kill time by listening to progressive metal music and watching cricket.

Connect with Pankaj

Website ǀ Facebook ǀ Twitter ǀ Instagram ǀ Goodreads

 

 

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3 thoughts on “The Fragile Thread of Hope by Pankaj Giri

  1. Wow, thank you so much, Cathy for such a wonderful spotlight. Love the way you introduced me and your lovely words about my extract. Appreciate it. Really rally grateful for your support. Eagerly waiting for your review. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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